Easy Access to Masterpieces – Rachel Adler ’18 on the PUAM

If, after entering the museum’s exhibit space, you go to the left and take the stairs down to the lower-level gallery, you may come across an extraordinary stele with a small sign standing on its flat, weathered top. The sign politely requests that visitors do not touch the stele, as it is very old and Read more about Easy Access to Masterpieces – Rachel Adler ’18 on the PUAM[…]

Hannah Waxman ’19 on Immersing Herself in the PUAM’s Collection

  I was uncertain about many things last year when I first arrived at Princeton – who my friends would be, what activities I would pursue, even what I would study. Faced with the overwhelming list of academic opportunities in Course Offerings, I settled on a freshman seminar entitled “Drawings Up Close.” The class attracted Read more about Hannah Waxman ’19 on Immersing Herself in the PUAM’s Collection[…]

Claude Monet’s World: Seen and Emulated, by Urvashi Uberoy ’20

  I dipped my brush into my water jar and then swirled it in a patch of vibrant green. I swished it across my canvas, applying a quick base coat. And then I looked up, snapped out of my trance, and remembered where I was. From where I was sitting, I could see a quaint Read more about Claude Monet’s World: Seen and Emulated, by Urvashi Uberoy ’20[…]

Art and Accessibility: Mariah McVey ’20 Shares a PUAM Experience

Perhaps my favorite moment in the Princeton University Art Museum unraveled in front of “The Death of Socrates,” a piece by Jacques-Louis David and his studio. A calling card of the European Art (17th-18th Centuries) gallery, the intentionally unfinished chef-d’œuvre, at least according to scholar Thomas Crow, served as a teaching tool.   In a Read more about Art and Accessibility: Mariah McVey ’20 Shares a PUAM Experience[…]

The Storied Past – Mohammad Adnan ’19 on the Katas Raj Temple Complex

  Growing up in London for the first eighteen years of my life, there was no dearth of museums and galleries to visit. In fact, the constant presence of art, though enjoyable, could also be overwhelming. Some of my favorite museum experiences in the city have been at exhibits that explore the intersection between fashion Read more about The Storied Past – Mohammad Adnan ’19 on the Katas Raj Temple Complex[…]

Wave After Wave – Cathleen Kong ’20

As a second semester senior in high school, my friends and I had no shortage of trips to DC. After school we’d take short, 30 minute metro rides to the city, and arrive at different stops each week: Dupont Circle, Gallery Place, Smithsonian, and occasionally, U-Street. Our adventures were varied, one day we’d check out Read more about Wave After Wave – Cathleen Kong ’20[…]

Unicorn in Captivity – Liana Cohen ’20

  I first saw the Unicorn Tapestries when I was about ten. My fifth-grade class took a field trip to the Cloisters in Fort Tryon Park in New York, a hidden, castle-like museum which displays medieval art. Our tour guide led us through the maze of corridors before depositing us in the Unicorn Tapestries Room. Read more about Unicorn in Captivity – Liana Cohen ’20[…]

Laura Herman ’18 on a Close and Colorful Look at Albers’ Work

In the fall of 2015, I took a class called “Notes on Color,” taught by visiting professor James Welling, who recently opened an exhibit at the David Zwirner Gallery. Throughout the class, we examined neurological color perception, philosophical color theories, and artistic usages of color.  This was all particularly interesting to me because I have Read more about Laura Herman ’18 on a Close and Colorful Look at Albers’ Work[…]

Nick Peabody on Discovering the Magic of the PUAM

As a freshman in the fall of 2013, I don’t think I even knew that Princeton had an Art Museum. When my mom, a lifelong art enthusiast, informed me of that fact and encouraged me to visit the museum, I shrugged it off. I’m busy. Museums are kind of boring. I don’t know much about Read more about Nick Peabody on Discovering the Magic of the PUAM[…]

Delaney Kerkhof’18 on an ever-changing experience with art

“The best thing, though, in that museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody’d move. You could go there a hundred thousand times, and that Eskimo would still be just finished catching those two fish, the birds would still be on their way south, the deers would still be drinking out of that water hole Read more about Delaney Kerkhof’18 on an ever-changing experience with art[…]

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