What will remain of us? – Joe Ort ’21

An intriguing shade of green more evocative of psychedelia than academia resides at the heart of Princeton’s campus. Feet from the warm, earthy hues of Morrison Hall and backlit by the slate-grey of Blair Hall stands the striking turquoise sheen of Henry Moore’s Oval with Points (1969). This color is likely familiar from a mutual Read more about What will remain of us? – Joe Ort ’21[…]

The Whitney: An Incomplete History of Protest – Yolanda Jin ’20

During the first sunny day after the relentless Spring Break snowstorm in New York City, I walked into the dimly lit space of the sixth-floor exhibition at the Whitney Museum. The first thing that registered in my mind was the stark white title An Incomplete History of Protest splayed out across the coal black wall. Read more about The Whitney: An Incomplete History of Protest – Yolanda Jin ’20[…]

Favorite Museum Experience – Raya Ward ’21

To be clear, I hated abstract art. I didn’t understand it. Not only was non objective art confusing, it was frustrating. I couldn’t figure out what these wacky artists were trying to say, and it seriously upset me. I was looking at a coded message––knowing it held something beautiful, some secret answer to an unknown Read more about Favorite Museum Experience – Raya Ward ’21[…]

Favorite Art Museum Experience – Sydney Goldman ’21

I will never forget sitting in a darkened seventh grade history room, legs crossed on an uncomfortable plastic chair, with an “Introduction to the Renaissance” Powerpoint playing on the projector. That was the day that I fell in love with Raphael. Raphael wasn’t one of the angsty, pre-pubescent boys in class who knew nothing but Read more about Favorite Art Museum Experience – Sydney Goldman ’21[…]

Making History Visible – Morgan Steelman ’20

Some of the greatest learning experiences occur outside of the classroom. One such experience for me was participating in the Making History Visible Tour at the Princeton University Art Museum. Led by a small number of students from the Student Advisory Board who were also trained art museum student tour guides, the tour allowed me Read more about Making History Visible – Morgan Steelman ’20[…]

The Louvre – Julia Cury ’19

My favorite aspect of museums has always been their capacity to create a sense of atmosphere. To me, the way that museums best create atmosphere is through the arrangement of their most decorative rooms. At the Princeton University Art Museum, the room I find to be most “decorative” and evocative of a certain period is Read more about The Louvre – Julia Cury ’19[…]

Favorite Piece in the Princeton University Art Museum – Joe Ort ’21

Few titles are as overt as Ships in Fog, Gloucester, Massachusetts, but I maintain that this wonderful Fitz Henry Lane piece is actually not about boats nor harbors nor indeed anything maritime. Before you conclude that I’ve gone off the deep end, let me qualify that statement: ships and the sea certainly inform the painting’s Read more about Favorite Piece in the Princeton University Art Museum – Joe Ort ’21[…]

The Vatican Museums – Ryan Golant ’20

In Rome, it seems like every corner upon every street is abounding with art. Enter one non-descript, unassuming building to find a cozy chapel with a set of Caravaggio masterpieces adorning the wall. Enter another, and come face-to-face with a brilliant Bernini sculpture—gold, marble, and all. Rome itself is a museum—one that I was lucky Read more about The Vatican Museums – Ryan Golant ’20[…]

Favorite Museum Experience – Anoushka Mariwala ’20

I recently completed my training as a student tour guide at the Princeton University Art Museum. As part of the training, the new class of student tour guides attended and participated in the annual Faculty and Staff Open House at the museum; It is this very museum experience that stands out to me today. When I usually visit a museum, I Read more about Favorite Museum Experience – Anoushka Mariwala ’20[…]

Uroda, Ursula von Rydingsvard – Cathleen Kong ’20

The buildings in the Engineering Quadrangle (EQuad) seem oddly disconnected with the rest of Princeton’s Gothic architecture. Besides its appearance, the EQuad is also physically dislocated from the center of student life. People like to joke about how far away the EQuad is, and having walked there innumerable times this summer and this year I Read more about Uroda, Ursula von Rydingsvard – Cathleen Kong ’20[…]