Revisiting Nature’s Nation During the Pandemic – Isabel Griffith-Gorgati ’21

eing away from campus and adapting to a lifestyle of social distancing has changed my way of thinking about how to conscientiously inhabit space with or without others. One of my favorite Princeton University Art Museum exhibits, Nature’s Nation: American Art and Environment (2018), is resonating with me in new ways right now. I’ve always loved living in the city, but during the pandemic I’ve been lucky to be able to spend most of my time in rural New Hampshire. Usually, I learn to love a place because of the people who make it feel like home, so it feels very different to develop an appreciation for a place precisely because it offers isolation.

Diseases in Children – Grace Guan ’20

On Thursday, November 14, Veronica White, Curator of Academic Programs, and I led a tour of the art museum’s exhibit States of Health: Visualizing Illness and Healing for my class MOL 460: Diseases in Children. The professor of MOL 460, Daniel Notterman, contributed to the exhibition. On view until February 2, 2020, States of Health Read more about Diseases in Children – Grace Guan ’20[…]

States of Health – Sydney Goldman ’21

This past Thursday, I was more than happy to brave our first real winter rain; I was headed to attend a talk on one of the new exhibitions at the Princeton University Art Museum. The exhibition, States of Health: Visualizing Illness and Healing, explores the visualization of health and healing in art forms from ancient Read more about States of Health – Sydney Goldman ’21[…]

Women of PUAM’s Highlights Tour – Grace Guan ’20

  March is Women’s History Month. To be honest, I didn’t really know what Women’s History Month was until recently, when I learned that it “recognizes the great contributions that women have made to our nation.” Upon further research, I realized that it was also celebrated in the UK, Australia, and Canada. In honor of Women’s Read more about Women of PUAM’s Highlights Tour – Grace Guan ’20[…]

Hold: A Meditation on Black Aesthetics – Cathleen Kong ’20

The mission of the exhibition Hold: A Meditation on Black Aesthetics was twofold. On one hand it displayed the Princeton University Art Museum’s initiative to raise exposure of African American art and works from artists of the African diaspora. On the other it tackled a conceptual problem: exhibiting black aesthetics without strictly defining black aesthetics. Read more about Hold: A Meditation on Black Aesthetics – Cathleen Kong ’20[…]