When Art Danced With Music: An Artistic Revolution – Anika Yardi ’21

“In 2013 I was fortunate enough to visit the National Gallery of Art to view a special exhibition — “Diaghalev and the Ballet Russes: When Art Danced With Music.” It showcased the history, theatricality, and unparalleled artwork of the Ballet Russes, a Russian ballet company that performed in the mid 20th century, breaking all traditions of ballet and dance.” Anika Yardi ’21 reflects on her experience, “The more I went through the exhibition, the more I was able to draw parallels between my dance practice and the art I saw before me. I saw similarities between the colorful costumes, the mythological and ancient stories being played out on a stage, and even the sense of camaraderie that can only come from putting on a production…. This experience made me reconsider my notion of what constituted art, and ever since then I have viewed both the dances that I perform and the art that I love in a more golden light.”

Countryside, The Future: An Art Museum’s Take on Modern Environmental Issues – Lois Wu ’23

The exhibition was designed to focus on issues surrounding land use in the “countryside”, roughly defined as any non-urban area… I love art museums and think that finding a sustainable human-environment relationship is one of the most pressing issues of our day, but I don’t generally think of art museums as champions of environmental activism—I wanted to see how these topics were brought together in this “not-art-exhibition”.

Color on a Cloudy Day – A Visit to Seattle’s Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibition – Sienna Byrne ’23

Usually when going to an art museum, I expect to mill around the galleries looking at various paintings or wander down a few statue-filled corridors. However, my visit to Chihuly Garden and Glass exhibition in Seattle completely turned my idea of being immersed in art on its head. The long-term exhibition first opened at Seattle Read more about Color on a Cloudy Day – A Visit to Seattle’s Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibition – Sienna Byrne ’23[…]

Finding Home in Art: The Delhi Art Gallery, New York City – Anoushka Mariwala ’21

It was a blustery day in New York City when I slipped inside the Fuller Building to visit the Delhi Art Gallery. The DAG in Mumbai is one of my favourite spaces in the city, especially because it happens to be one of the only avenues that displays modern and contemporary Indian art. During fall Read more about Finding Home in Art: The Delhi Art Gallery, New York City – Anoushka Mariwala ’21[…]

The Hedgehog and the Fox – Ryan Golant ’20

Just outside Peyton Hall stand three vast, towering walls of rusted steel: Richard Serra’s The Hedgehog and the Fox. The sheets tilt slightly, bending precariously as they snake back and forth–where one slab protrudes outwards, another curves inwards, forming a sinuous alcove between the barriers. Reddened and worn, blemished from age and exposure, the corroded Read more about The Hedgehog and the Fox – Ryan Golant ’20[…]

Death of Socrates – Anika Yardi ’21

Jacque Louis David’s Death of Socrates is probably my favorite piece in the Princeton University Art Museum. Even before you know anything about the work, there is something immediately striking about it– the fierce expression of the man in the middle, his finger pointed upwards to the heavens is in stark contrast with the grief-stricken Read more about Death of Socrates – Anika Yardi ’21[…]

My Favorite Princeton University Art Museum Artwork – Joe Ort ‘ 21

     Van Gogh’s Tarascon Stagecoach has fast become one of my favorite pieces in the Princeton University Art Museum. Through its very texture, this 1888 painting conveys the dustiness of the coach’s sunbaked route. The road is indeterminate and chalky, the rims of stagecoach’s wheels coated in the same striking color. Van Gogh has detailed the Read more about My Favorite Princeton University Art Museum Artwork – Joe Ort ‘ 21[…]

The Musée Rodin, Paris, France – Shelby Kinch ’22

The Musée Rodin, located in the beautiful 7th Arrondissement feels like a secret garden in which art, birds, and history nestle amongst the flora. This summer I unexpectedly got the opportunity to visit this hidden enclave of art history. I had began the day eager to visit The Musée d’Orsay, a museum housed in a Read more about The Musée Rodin, Paris, France – Shelby Kinch ’22[…]

Favorite Art Museum Experience – Binita Gupta ’20

I lived a 5-minute walk away from the Princeton University Art Museum for an entire three months, without caring to venture inside. It was undoubtedly a beautiful building, with stained-glass structures guarding the outside and stunning trapeze artists gracing the inside. Unfortunately, I was a freshman who glanced over it just like I glanced over Read more about Favorite Art Museum Experience – Binita Gupta ’20[…]

Favorite Object at the Princeton University Art Museum – Julia Cury ’19

I’ve always been interested in both medieval art and 19th century art. When I first saw the work of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, recalling the dark ages yet strangely modern, mixed with hints of the Realism and Romanticism so crucial to the 19th century, I was transfixed. I’ve made pilgrimages to museums and exhibitions to see Read more about Favorite Object at the Princeton University Art Museum – Julia Cury ’19[…]